One theme I wanted to play with in this story is how a person’s actions can be interpreted very differently based on preconceptions or prior influence.

This is one such payoff for me; what many characters took as a demeaning action to try and put a strong woman out of sight and out of mind turned out quite differently once the full reasons were revealed; but I’d like to think that hints that things weren’t like they seemed even at the time I set the stage.

For example; on this page, it’s noted that the fishing grounds was an area that could lend itself easily to an attack.  Denver’s little friend commented that it had been a concern, but not anymore.  Now we know exactly why, and that rather than a demeaning post (for a culture that values hunting one of the highest and important duties), it was in truth a post that was granted to Diana because she was only one that Wyll-Line felt could do the job right, to keep a level head and not do something foolish just in case the pleas for peace from their old enemies was a ruse.

A further subtle hint that things might not be how they seemed was the authority Diana projected here.  Knowing what we do now, does it look like a woman upset at her station?  She’s fully in control, she knows she has the authority to speak for the chieftain, attempting to negotiate a “smaller weir” to use for fishing.

To go even further on Wyll-Line’s intentionally poor lighting, starting here, when he puts Tiffany’s companions to work.  I intentionally cast the scene to make the chieftain’s actions quite insulting… now think of it this way;

Sending Niels to work with the senior men of the camp, who he hoped wouldn’t be dumb enough to pick a fight with the armored bear (and they managed to avoid that)…

Peonie wound up “working” right under his own roof…

And Denver was sent where Diana could keep an eye on him.

Yes… this is the sort of stuff that runs through my head as I plan out stories.

No… I’m not normal.